I have written recently about the 5,4,3,2,1 exercise and the Strengthening Exercise devised by Captain Tom Bunn for nervous fliers and useful also in non-flying situations where the nervous system is challenged by fear. I thought you might like to hear about the research that supports the Strengthening Exercise so here is an excerpt from Captain Tom’s newsletter.

“When facing a challenge, an attuned and non-judgmental person can help us approach the situation with less anxiety. The parasympathetic nervous system (the system that calms by neutralizing stress hormones) is activated by the face, voice, and touch of such a friend – or by the memory of their face, voice, and touch. SOAR has helped countless people fly by linking the memory of being with a calming person to challenging moments of flight.

New research shows that having a calming friend in mind is as protective against stress as having the friend physically present. At the University of Arizona, 102 participants were put in a stressful situation. The participants, all of whom were in a committed romantic relationship, were split into three groups.

During stress, one group was asked to think about their day. A second group was asked to think about their romantic partner. The third group had their partner present. Both the second group and third group had lower blood pressure than the first group. Not only that, the researchers found no difference in the response of the second and the third group. One of the researchers, Kyle Bourassa, said “It appears that thinking about your partner as a source of support can be just as powerful as actually having them present.”

“Life is full of stress, and one critical way we can manage this stress is through our relationships — either with our partner directly or by calling on a mental image of that person,” Bourassa said. “There are many situations, including at work, with school exams or even during medical procedures, where we would benefit from limiting our degree of blood pressure reactivity, and these findings suggest that a relational approach to doing so can be quite powerful.”

As many readers know, in the SOAR program, we control high anxiety during flight by linking each challenging moment of flight to a person who, physically or psychologically present, activates the parasympathetic nervous system.

In day-to-day living, we can reduce stress by doing this three-step parasympathetic activating exercise:

When you notice stress,

  • Imagine you see a friend or a romantic partner come into the room.
  • Imagine hearing the person greet you.
  • Imagine the person comes over and gives you a friendly touch

By repeating this exercise each time you notice stress, you will establish a program in your unconscious procedural memory that will unconsciously calm you when stress arises.”

 

I hope so much that this will help others like me to cope better with daily challenges and to extraordinary challenges such as flying or other phobias. Please contact me direct if you would like to work on these issues with psychotherapeutic support.

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